STEM Senior water education special edition: – Florida’s vanishing springs resource index – by author Craig Pittman – 5 part series

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STEM Education Water Science Resource

Florida Springs

Alapaha Rise
Alexander
Baptising Sink
Beckton
Black
Blue Hole
Blue Hole (Bronson)
Blue (Madison)
Blue (Marianna)
Blue (Mayo)
Blue Grotto
Blue (Orange City)
Bonnet
Branford
Catfish Sink
Charles
Chassahowitzka River
Cherokee
Convict
Cow
Crystal River
Cypress
DeLeon
Devil’s Den
Devil’s Eye and Devil’s Ear
Eureka
Fanning

Alphabetical

Fern Hammock
Fletcher
Forty Fathom Grotto
Gainer
Gemini
Ginnie
Glen Julia
Guaranto
Hart
Holton
Homosassa
Hudson Grotto
Ichetucknee and Blue
Juniper
Kini
Lime
Lithia
Little River
Manatee
Mearson
Morrison
Natural Bridge
Newport
Orange Grove
Orange Grove II
Orange Grove III
Otter
Paradise

Listing

Peacock I and II
Peacock III
Pitts
Ponce de Leon
Rainbow
Rock
Rock Bluff
Royal
Running
Salt
Silver
Silver Glen
Springboard
St. Marks
Sun
Suwannee
Telford
Telford Sinks I and II
Troy
Turtle
Vortex
Wacissa
Wakulla
Waldo
Weeki Wachee
Wekiwa
Welaka
Williford

Florida’s vanishing springs: Series 1-5

Article courtesy of Craig Pittman | January 29, 2013 |Tampa Bay Times | Shared as educational material only


North of Gainesville, a church camp once attracted thousands of visitors because it was built around the gushing waters of Hornsby Springs. Then the spring stopped flowing and the camp had to spend more than $1 million to build a water park to replace it. The old spring site is now so stagnant that it’s frequently declared unfit for humans to swim in. In Silver Springs, where the water was once so clear it was as if the fish swam through ­air, there are now goopy mats of algae so thick that alligators can perch atop them. And in the Ocala National Forest, the gurgle of fresh water pouring out of popular Silver Glen Spring is slowly growing saltier. Deep beneath the ground we stand on, below the strip malls and the condos and the lush green of the golf courses, runs a river of water that makes life in Florida possible. The underground aquifer rushes through Swiss cheese caverns, its hidden flow bubbling up to the surface in Florida’s roughly 1,000 springs — the greatest concentration of springs on Earth.

A century ago Florida’s gin-clear springs drew presidents and millionaires and tourists galore who sought to cure their ailments by bathing in the healing cascades. Now the springs tell the story of a hidden sickness, one that lies deep within the earth:
To read the rest of the article please click on>> Water in many springs no longer boils up like a fountain.

Learn more about Florida’s springs

Contact information: . Craig PittmanCaryn BairdDarla CameronChris Zuppa

Craig Pittman, Times Staff Writer

Craig Pittman is a native Floridian. He graduated from Troy State University in Alabama, where his muckraking work for the student paper prompted an agitated dean to label him “the most destructive force on campus.” Since then he has covered a variety of newspaper beats and quite a few natural disasters, including hurricanes, wildfires and the Florida Legislature. Since 1998 he has reported on environmental issues for the Times. He is a four-time winner of the Waldo Proffitt Award for Distinguished Environmental Journalism in Florida and a series of stories on Florida’s vanishing wetlands that he wrote with Matthew Waite won the top investigative reporting award in both 2006 and 2007 from the Society of Environmental Journalists.

Craig is the author of three books:

“The Scent of Scandal: Greed, Betrayal, and the World’s Most Beautiful Orchid” (2012);
“Manatee Insanity: Inside the War Over Florida’s Most Famous Endangered Species,” (2010);
“Paving Paradise: Florida’s Vanishing Wetlands and the Failure of No Net Loss,” co-written with Waite (2009).
All of them published by the University Press of Florida. He lives in St. Petersburg with his wife and two children.
To contact Craig phone: (727) 893-8530 / E-mail: craig@tampabay.com / Twitter: @craigimes

 

Mystery at Silver Glen

In the middle of the Ocala National Forest lies Silver Glen Springs, the one spring in Florida that has all the scientists scratching their heads. Read more

Silver Springs no longer sparkles

To the tourists, nothing’s changed. The glass-bottom boats still chug back and forth across the bubbling bowl of water, and they can peer down and see fish and turtles swimming along as if they were cruising above a giant aquarium.

Read more

 

One Tampa spring can’t be saved

Twelve years ago, when a panel of experts published a report on everything wrong with Florida’s springs, one meager ray of light came from Sulphur Spring in Tampa.

Read more

Owners struggle to protect ecotourism site

Ginnie Springs, named for a woman who once washed laundry there, has long been the most popular freshwater diving location in the world . Thousands of divers have explored its fossils and limestone formations.

Read more

 

Other Florida Springs articles from Tampa Bay Times / Environment

Other related articles from Tampa Bay Times / Environment

 

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