Alberta Canada water crisis news: 3,000 barrels of oil spilled from pipeline. Water OK after Canadian oil spill [UPI.com timeline]

3,000 barrels of oil spilled, water crisis,pipeline company in Canada said water tests revealed drinking water met quality standards a week after an oil spill in Alberta province.One week after the spill? Oil spill pictures included in this article state different

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Water crisis issue? Illustrated water cycle: Marine debris bulletin: Identifying high pressure “gas cylinders from Japan debris”

On March 11, 2011, a devastating 9.0 earthquake and tsunami struck Japan. The disaster claimed nearly 16,000 lives, injured 6,000, and destroyed or damaged countless buildings. As a result of the disaster, NOAA expects a portion of the debris that the tsunami washed into the ocean to reach U.S. and Canadian shores over the next several years.

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Contaminated drinking water news: NEERI develops indigenous process to reduce high fluoride in water content.

The National Environmental Engineering Research Institute (CSIR-NEERI) developed an indigenous and economically viable process to reduce high fluoride content in potable water, which would have a domestic and community applications.The chemo-defluoridation of potable water with high fluoride content is achieved in collaboration with the Mumbai-based Rajeev Gandhi Science and Technology Commission, and can be used for reduction of fluoride concentration from 5-8 mg/L to < 1.0 mg/L (miligram per litre). The process does not affect the palatability of water.

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USA water crisis: Twin Falls: Idaho storage reservoirs are still critically low. [Twin Falls, Idaho (KMVT-TV)]

Idaho storage reservoirs are still critically low. Twin Falls, Idaho (KMVT-TV) Although Idaho Power crews have restored power to the city’s water pumps, all of the pumps have not been restarted. Even then, storage reservoirs are still critically low.

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Using water from wells leads to sea level rise, cancels out effect of dams.

As people pump groundwater for irrigation, drinking water, and industrial uses, the water doesn’t just seep back into the ground — it also evaporates into the atmosphere, or runs off into rivers and canals, eventually emptying into the world’s oceans. This water adds up, and a new study calculates that by 2050, groundwater pumping will cause a global sea level rise of about 0.8 millimeters per year.

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