Toxic Waste ‘Polluting River That Supplies Drinking Water’ to Northern Ireland City

In 2014, the head of waste management at the Northern Ireland Environmental Agency, Mark Livingstone, said that despite 1.5 million litres of contaminated fluid being removed from a toxic lake in Campsie, a wet winter could spell disaster.

CONTINUE READING

Widespread Lead Poisoning in Flint, Michigan

Soon after the transition was made, residents began complaining about the quality of the water, noting its strange color, taste, and smell. With proceeding investigations, it was found that the Flint river, and therefore the water being supplied to the community, was contaminated with almost unprecedented amounts of lead.

CONTINUE READING

Pamelia Residents Close to DOT Salt Shed Experience Water Contamination Problems Like Orleans’

A few town of Pamelia residents on Route 342 west of Interstate 81 endured water contamination and pipe corrosion long before a new municipal water line was constructed in 2013.

CONTINUE READING

Was Flint River Water Good Enough to Drink?

The river water is blamed for corroding pipes and plumbing throughout Flint and elevating lead levels in children after it became the primary source of drinking water for the city in April 2014. But experts say the river may be getting a bad rap.

CONTINUE READING

More Ethanol Means More Toxic Water Pollution

Some corn ethanol lobbyists are pushing to triple the amount of ethanol American fuel makers put into gasoline, moving from the current blend, called E10, of 90 percent gasoline and 10 percent corn ethanol to E30, which would be 70 percent gasoline and 30 percent corn ethanol. They argue that using more of their so-called renewable fuel would benefit the environment.

CONTINUE READING

DEP Urged to Act Quickly on Hazardous Chemical Found in NJ Water Supplies

Renewed concern about a chemical found in some of New Jersey’s drinking water is prompting state officials to work with utilities to seek treatment solutions and a state scientific panel’s research is expected to lead to stricter regulation of what the federal Environmental Protection Agency says is a likely carcinogen.

CONTINUE READING

EPA Says It ‘Did Its Job’ Despite Not Telling Flint Its Water Was Contaminated

The EPA spent months quietly warning state regulators of the lack of corrosion controls for Flint’s water supplies. The EPA told the state it needed to use chemical treatments to prevent lead lines and plumbing from getting into Flint’s drinking water, but the agency did nothing to publicize its concerns over the city’s water despite the state’s refusal to control against lead poisoning.

CONTINUE READING

Higher Levels of Contaminants Found in Oak Hills Water

The Water and Sanitation Division of the county’s Special Districts Department sent a letter to Oak Hills residents in County Service Area 70J reporting that higher levels of hexavalent chromium have been discovered in the water system, which “violated a drinking standard.”

CONTINUE READING

Major Study of Contaminated Water Shows Progress, Challenges Ahead

A sophisticated study blending 35 years of well contamination tests shows high levels of toxic nitrate is turning up a little less frequently in Dane County-area drinking water.

CONTINUE READING

Flint Mayor: Water Fix Could Cost As Much As $1.5B

Flint Mayor Karen Weaver said Thursday replacing her city’s myriad lead-leaching water pipes could cost as much as $1.5 billion, while the state’s top health official deemed Flint’s water unsafe to drink without filtration.

CONTINUE READING

Algae Study Upsets Old Nitrogen Ideas

“The nutrient phosphorus has long been regarded as the key to algal growth in freshwater systems. However our results show that both phosphorus and nitrogen are equally important for growth of algae,” study authors Stefanie Mueller and Simon Mitrovic of Sydney’s University of Technology explained in a statement.

CONTINUE READING

Memphis Counts Its Blessings, Challenges by the Gallon

MLGW and Shelby County’s suburbs are pumping about 220 million gallons a day out of the Memphis Sand. We use water from the Memphis Sand to make sweet tea and craft beer. We use it to cook and clean and flush. We use it to water our lawns and crops, put out fires and manufacture everything from medical devices to air conditioners to toilet paper.

CONTINUE READING
Want to Donate?
Please contact us for gifts in kind - Mail your check to: P.O. Box 545934, Surfside, Fl 33154