Delaware Drinking Water at Risk: Prescription drugs on tap from major suppliers

Newly released details from a state drinking water study show that prescription drugs and personal care chemicals have crept into water supplies used by every major water utility tested.

The results, provided in response to a request from The News Journal, show smatterings of medicines ranging from analgesics and antibiotics to anti-convulsives and hormones in water used both by public and private companies, including all three of New Castle County’s largest public utilities and major suppliers in Kent and Sussex counties.

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Pinellas Health Department tests more wells for arsenic

Clearwater, Florida — Dozens of calls are coming into the Pinellas Health Department after an alert went out to homeowners in North County with private drinking water wells.

Environmental specialist Lisa Frazier says the department has received more than 70 calls so far in one day after random water samples showed high levels of arsenic.

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UN expert welcomes declaration that clean water and sanitation is a human right

A United Nations expert today welcomed the General Assembly’s declaration this week that safe and clean drinking water is a human right, calling it a “landmark resolution” that sends an important signal to the world.

Catarina de Albuquerque, the UN Independent Expert on human rights, water and sanitation, issued a statement in which she said the declaration augured well for the summit at UN Headquarters in New York in September, when world leaders are set to review progress towards the social and economic targets known as the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs).

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Volcano ash sparks health fears

HEALTH authorities have warned that the fallout of volcanic ash over parts of Iceland could jeopardize the safety of its drinking water.

And a geophysicist said the eruption showed no signs of abating.

Halldor Runolfsson from the Icelandic Food and Veterinary Authority said there were concerns for human health but the greatest risk was to livestock.

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Oklahoma reservoirs unsafe for swimming, but OK for drinking?

Blue-green algae is thriving in Oklahoma’s reservoirs this summer due to the combined factors of high heat, drought, and the resulting stagnant water, reports News9.com. Although the presence of thealgae, which can be toxic to humans and animals, prevents people from swimming in the reservoirs around Oklahoma City, News9.com advises that water treatment officials say drinking water is safe. Water treatment plants use a process that eliminates the algae from the public drinking water.

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What you need to know about chloramine-treated water.

Americans have clean and safe drinking water because water-supply companies rigorously treat it to adhere to U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations. While chlorine has long been used as a disinfectant in drinking water, more and more U.S. water supply companies have been switching to chloramine. In fact, the EPA estimates that more than one in five Americans use drinking water that contains chloramine.

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Fluoride spill at water facility burns through parking lot cement

A spill of a highly corrosive chemical, Hydrofluorosilicic acid, at a water facility in Illinois literally burned through the concrete. Interesting fact: this chemical is directly added to drinking water as fluoride.

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