Water Crisis: China – The lingering drought hits Yunnan – SW China

Workers build water pipeline at Luxi County in Honghe Hani and Yi Autonomous Prefecture, southwest China’s Yunnan Province,

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SHAI Forum Highlights ExxonMobil MTBE Investigation

The environmental forum, recently sponsored by the Sephardic Heritage Alliance, Inc. for the community, provided a rare opportunity for the public to meet some of the experts who are involved in the investigation and eventual clean-up of the ExxonMobil gasoline leak containing methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) that has sullied the uppermost level of our aquifer system. While the investigation is ongoing, we do know that the plume has not reached drinking water wells.

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‘Miracle Tree’ Substance Produces Clean Drinking Water Inexpensively And Sustainably

A natural substance obtained from seeds of the “miracle tree” could purify and clarify water inexpensively and sustainably in the developing world, where more than 1 billion people lack access to clean drinking water, scientists report. Research on the potential of a sustainable water-treatment process requiring only tree seeds and sand appears in ACS’ journal Langmuir.

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Pennsyvlania Groups Warn of Nuclear Plant Dangers to Drinking Water

Nuclear plants in the U.S. and abroad are putting drinking water sources at risk, two Pennsylvania environmental groups claim. The groups pointed to the a continuing nuclear crisis in Japan that originated with last year’s catastrophic tsunami as an example of a nuclear power plant that impacted drinking water supplies thousands of miles away.

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Water a basic right, U.N. says.

Access to clean drinking water and sanitation is a basic human right, the U.N. General Assembly said in a symbolic resolution.

The U.N. General Assembly passed a measure with no opposition that puts clean drinking water and sanitation on the same footing as the right to live without racial discrimination.

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Pinellas Health Department tests more wells for arsenic

Clearwater, Florida — Dozens of calls are coming into the Pinellas Health Department after an alert went out to homeowners in North County with private drinking water wells.

Environmental specialist Lisa Frazier says the department has received more than 70 calls so far in one day after random water samples showed high levels of arsenic.

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UN expert welcomes declaration that clean water and sanitation is a human right

A United Nations expert today welcomed the General Assembly’s declaration this week that safe and clean drinking water is a human right, calling it a “landmark resolution” that sends an important signal to the world.

Catarina de Albuquerque, the UN Independent Expert on human rights, water and sanitation, issued a statement in which she said the declaration augured well for the summit at UN Headquarters in New York in September, when world leaders are set to review progress towards the social and economic targets known as the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs).

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Treating stormwater management as regional issue

Many local officials are understandably worried about state requirements that they spend millions of dollars on keeping polluted run-off out of the state’s streams and drinking water sources.

But while townships from Montgomery, Chester, Berks and Delaware counties have joined together to make their voice heard in Harrisburg, few people are offering an alternative.

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Volcano ash sparks health fears

HEALTH authorities have warned that the fallout of volcanic ash over parts of Iceland could jeopardize the safety of its drinking water.

And a geophysicist said the eruption showed no signs of abating.

Halldor Runolfsson from the Icelandic Food and Veterinary Authority said there were concerns for human health but the greatest risk was to livestock.

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Oklahoma reservoirs unsafe for swimming, but OK for drinking?

Blue-green algae is thriving in Oklahoma’s reservoirs this summer due to the combined factors of high heat, drought, and the resulting stagnant water, reports News9.com. Although the presence of thealgae, which can be toxic to humans and animals, prevents people from swimming in the reservoirs around Oklahoma City, News9.com advises that water treatment officials say drinking water is safe. Water treatment plants use a process that eliminates the algae from the public drinking water.

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