Hoosick Falls Community Tackles Water Contamination

Imagine going to your faucet and filling a glass of water and having to think twice about drinking it? That’s how some people here in are living. It’s been this way since last month in Hoosick Falls, after water samples from a manufacturing company here in the village tested positive for high levels of a chemical called PFOA.

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How to Solve the West’s Abandoned Mine Problem

Though the florescent orange runoff from the Gold King Mine has long since faded from the Animas River, the effort to prevent similar, future environmental disasters from happening at the thousands of abandoned mines that dot the West has endured.

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Elevated Lead Found in Auburn Drinking Water

Routine tests found more than double the amount detected three years ago. Auburn now joins several dozen other water systems in the state that are on increased lead monitoring.

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Strategies for Protecting Water During an Emergency

Water is a critical part of people’s everyday lives. In parts of the world where access to clean water is impeded, the effects have extensive implications for people and the environment. When a disaster hits, even countries with the safest water supplies can become vulnerable to a myriad of problems.

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Hoosick Falls to Receive Free Water Amid Contamination Concerns

Free, bottled water will be provided to those that live in the village of Hoosick Falls over fear of possible contamination in the groundwater. Wells surrounding the manufacturing plant Saint-Gobain Performance Plastics in Hoosick Falls had high levels of a chemical called PFOA.

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Reported Contamination in Parts of Little Sugar Creek

residents to stay out of parts of Little Sugar Creek in North Charlotte after two dangerous chemicals, that could cause cancer and organ damage with steady exposure, have been found in part of Little Sugar Creek.

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Marin Fire Agencies Find Ways to Conserve Water

Fire departments were not included in the state mandate to cut water use, but that hasn’t stopped California’s Marin fire officials from letting station lawns go brown, skipping vehicle washes and getting creative to slow the flow of water.

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Seattle, Tacoma and Everett Ask People to Conserve Water

The cities of Seattle, Tacoma and Everett are asking people to avoid wasting water in response to the hot, dry weather and low river levels. The cities have implemented stage one of their water storage response plans. Seattle and Everett say their water outlook is “fair” and they should have enough water supply into fall when rainfall typically replenishes the supply.

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It’s Not in the Bag

Undeterred by the failure of a ban on plastic bags in Dallas this past May, the Fort Worth Sierra Club is going ahead with an attempt to ban the containers in our city. American retailers use some 100 billion plastic bags a year, contributing to the contamination of the water supply and the increase in the size of the Pacific Trash Vortex, as well as clogging sewers and presenting a choking hazard to all manner of wildlife and marine life.

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Sewer Upgrades Seek to Limit Overflows, Phosphorous

If you live in Greater Lafayette, you know how bad the Wabash River can smell when it rains. Many in the community consider it dirty and polluted.Some of that speculation, it turns out, is based on truth. Although levels are much lower than 10 or 20 years ago, raw sewage still escapes into the Wabash during periods of heavy rain.

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River Basin Commission Releases Report

The Susquehanna River Basin Commission (SRBC) last week released its third report on water quality conditions in select watersheds in the Marcellus shale region of the Susquehanna River Basin. Prior to 2010, when SRBC began collecting the data through its state-of-the-art Remote Water Quality Monitoring Network (RWQMN), little to no water quality data existed for many smaller streams in northern Pennsylvania and the southern tier of New York.

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