EPA Study: Says hydraulic fracturing likely contaminated drinking water in Wyoming town

The Environmental Protection Agency announced Thursday that it suspects hydraulic fracturing in a shallow natural gas well in Wyoming contaminated a town’s drinking water. After three years of study, the agency concluded that chemicals found in the aquifer and in individual wells were consistent with those used in hydraulic fracturing.

The agency issued a report that will be open for public comment and scientific review. If it is finalized with the same conclusions, it could provide the first documented case in which “fracking” contaminated groundwater.

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Report: Radioactive fracking waste being dumped into waterways that feed drinking water supplies

Natural gas companies are dumping radioactive wastewater from fracking into rivers and streams that serve as the main drinking water supply for millions of people — and “dangers to the environment and health” arising from this practice are “greater than previously understood.

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Delaware Drinking Water at Risk: Prescription drugs on tap from major suppliers

Newly released details from a state drinking water study show that prescription drugs and personal care chemicals have crept into water supplies used by every major water utility tested.

The results, provided in response to a request from The News Journal, show smatterings of medicines ranging from analgesics and antibiotics to anti-convulsives and hormones in water used both by public and private companies, including all three of New Castle County’s largest public utilities and major suppliers in Kent and Sussex counties.

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Pinellas Health Department tests more wells for arsenic

Clearwater, Florida — Dozens of calls are coming into the Pinellas Health Department after an alert went out to homeowners in North County with private drinking water wells.

Environmental specialist Lisa Frazier says the department has received more than 70 calls so far in one day after random water samples showed high levels of arsenic.

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Treating stormwater management as regional issue

Many local officials are understandably worried about state requirements that they spend millions of dollars on keeping polluted run-off out of the state’s streams and drinking water sources.

But while townships from Montgomery, Chester, Berks and Delaware counties have joined together to make their voice heard in Harrisburg, few people are offering an alternative.

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Volcano ash sparks health fears

HEALTH authorities have warned that the fallout of volcanic ash over parts of Iceland could jeopardize the safety of its drinking water.

And a geophysicist said the eruption showed no signs of abating.

Halldor Runolfsson from the Icelandic Food and Veterinary Authority said there were concerns for human health but the greatest risk was to livestock.

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What you need to know about chloramine-treated water.

Americans have clean and safe drinking water because water-supply companies rigorously treat it to adhere to U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations. While chlorine has long been used as a disinfectant in drinking water, more and more U.S. water supply companies have been switching to chloramine. In fact, the EPA estimates that more than one in five Americans use drinking water that contains chloramine.

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