Are You Getting Medications in Your Drinking Water?

A report in 2008 by the Associated Press (AP) stated that 41 million unaware Americans have various trace amounts of pharmaceuticals, such as birth control pills, pain killers, and antibiotics in their drinking water due to the public flushing their unwanted medications.

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What Can I Do With All The Unused, Expired Medications in My Medicine Cabinet?

Do you have your medicine cabinet filled with expired medications, over the counter drugs or medicines you no longer use? The National Prescription Drug Take-back programs are the best way to dispose of old medications. It aims to provide a safe, convenient, and responsible means of disposing of prescription drugs.

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New discovery suggests oceans of water beneath Earth’s surface

There could be an ocean’s worth of water more than 300 miles under the Earth’s surface that equals the known water content across the entire planet. Findings show that water was found in a sample of ringwoodite, a stone formed under extreme pressure inside the Earth’s mantle.

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What is TSCA?

By updating the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA), Congress can create the foundation for a sound and comprehensive chemicals policy that protects public health and the environment, while restoring the luster of safety to U.S. goods in the world market.

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The Power Of Food, Water And Energy ‘Nexus Thinking’

Today, both business and government are constantly thinking about how to feed more people, power more homes and cars, and provide clean drinking water. But it is increasingly apparent that the use of our precious resources to meet one need is inherently linked to the the others in the food, water and energy “nexus.”

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You Won’t Believe How Much Water It Takes To Grow Your Favorite Foods

California, supplier of nearly half of all US fruits, veggies, and nuts, is on track to experience the driest year in the past half millennium. Farms use about 80 percent of the state’s “developed water,” or water that’s moved from its natural source to other areas via pipes and aqueducts.

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How river networks move across a landscape

Large river networks — such as those that funnel into the Colorado and Mississippi rivers — may seem to be permanent features of a landscape. In fact, many rivers define political boundaries that have been in place for centuries. Now researchers have developed a mapping technique that measures how much a river network is changing, and in what direction it may be moving.

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Ocean food web is key in the global carbon cycle

Nothing dies of old age in the ocean. Everything gets eaten and all that remains of anything is waste. But that waste is pure gold to an oceanographer. In a study of the ocean’s role in the global carbon cycle, oceanographers used those nuggets to their advantage. They incorporated the lifecycle of phytoplankton and zooplankton — small, often microscopic animals at the bottom of the food chain — into a novel mechanistic model for assessing the global ocean carbon export.

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New tech uses microbes to cut water waste from beer

As drought worsens in the western US, Cambrian Innovations aims to reduce water consumption and cost while making energy.

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Water tech startup aims to green manure at factory farms

Manure from livestock farms can be environmentally damaging. A new treatment system could clean up its impact, but will that just hide deeper problems in an unsustainable industry?

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Americans underestimate household water usage

A survey conducted by Indiana University researcher Shahzeen Attari has found that many Americans are confused about the best ways to conserve water around the home. Her results have been published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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Lake Erie algae growth threatens tourism, drinking water

According to a Canada-U.S. environmental study released Thursday, an increasing amount of algae is sucking the oxygen out of Lake Erie, leaving a pungent smell and icky green water.

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