New water treatment technology can seek-and-destroy harmful pathogens

By Kimberly Sung, Associate Director of Education for Save the Water | December 15th, 2016 In recent years, harmful bacteria like Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Listeria monocytogenes (Listeria) have been responsible for high-profile outbreaks of illness and even death. Though cases of infection often arise from food sources, further investigation reveals contaminated water as […]

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Newburgh State of Emergency Highlights PFOS as Growing Concern

By Suraj Rajendran, Staff Writer for Save The Water™ | June 27, 2016 A state of emergency was declared in Newburgh, New York, after the New York State Department of Conservation discovered the toxic chemical perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) in the lake that supplies the city with drinking water. City manager Michael Ciaravino called the state […]

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In W. Virginia, Frack Wastewater May Be Messing With Hormones

Water around and downstream from a fracking wastewater disposal facility in West Virginia contains compounds that may harm fish health by messing with endocrine systems, according to a new study.

Fracking, or hydraulic fracturing, is a process that uses horizontal drilling and high volume fluid injections to release oil and gas. Along with water, the injections contain sand and a mix of chemicals—some of which have been linked to cancer, hormone impacts, and reproductive problems. It’s estimated that every well produces more than one million gallons of wastewater, which is eventually pumped into disposal wells. Researchers found high levels of endocrine disruption activity in the water near or downstream from the wastewater site in Fayetteville, West Virginia. The study, published today in the journal Science of the Total Environment, adds to evidence that some chemicals in hydraulic fracturing waste are hormone-mimickers or blockers and are leaching out of wastewater disposal wells and into nearby water, potentially impacting fish and human health.

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Your Water Could Be Worse Than Flint’s: America’s Shameful National Public Health Crisis

Flint residents knew there was a serious problem with their water when it came out of the tap brown and foul-smelling after the city of Flint changed its source from Lake Huron to the Flint River two years ago. They didn’t know, however, that lead levels were so high that the Environmental Protection Agency could classify it as hazardous waste. It took Michigan Republican Gov. Rick Snyder and the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality more than 17 months to acknowledge the problem. As a result, tens of thousands of Flint residents have been—and continue to be—poisoned.

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Assessment of Drinking Water Quality from Bottled Water Coolers

Drinking water quality can be deteriorated by microbial and toxic chemicals during transport, storage and handling before using by the consumer. This study was conducted to evaluate the microbial and physicochemical quality of drinking water from bottled water coolers.

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Microbial Contamination of Drinking Water and Human Health from Community Water Systems

A relatively short list of reference viral, bacterial and protozoan pathogens appears adequate to assess microbial risks and inform a system-based management of drinking waters.

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Water Microbiology. Bacterial Pathogens and Water

Water is essential to life, but many people do not have access to clean and safe drinking water and many die of waterborne bacterial infections. In this review a general characterization of the most important bacterial diseases transmitted through water—cholera, typhoid fever and bacillary dysentery—is presented, focusing on the biology and ecology of the causal agents and on the diseases’ characteristics and their life cycles in the environment

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Well-Water Consumption and Parkinson’s Disease in Rural California

Investigators have hypothesized that consuming pesticide-contaminated well water plays a role in Parkinson’s disease (PD), and several previous epidemiologic studies support this hypothesis. Our study, the first to use agricultural pesticide application records, adds evidence that consuming well water presumably contaminated with pesticides may play a role in the etiology of PD.

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A Large Community Outbreak of Gastroenteritis Associated with Consumption of Drinking Water Contaminated by River Water, Belgium, 2010

On 6 December 2010 a fire in Hemiksem, Belgium, was extinguished by the fire brigade with both river water and tap water. Local physicians were asked to report all cases of gastroenteritis. We conducted a retrospective cohort study among 1000 randomly selected households. The results support the hypothesis that a point-source contamination of the tap water with river water was the cause of the multi-pathogen waterborne outbreak.

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Breast Cancer Risk and Drinking Water Contaminated by Wastewater: a Case Control Study

Drinking water contaminated by wastewater is a potential source of exposure to mammary carcinogens and endocrine disrupting compounds from commercial products and excreted natural and pharmaceutical hormones. These contaminants are hypothesized to increase breast cancer risk. We conducted a case-control study to investigate whether exposure to drinking water contaminated by wastewater increases the risk of breast cancer. Results did not provide evidence of an association between breast cancer and drinking water contaminated by wastewater.

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Muddying the Waters: A New Area of Concern for Drinking Water Contamination in Cameroon

In urban Maroua, Cameroon, improved drinking water sources are available to a large majority of the population, yet this water is frequently distributed through informal distribution systems and stored in home containers (canaries), leaving it vulnerable to contamination.

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Contamination of the Conchos River in Mexico: Does It Pose a Health Risk to Local Residents?

Presently, water contamination issues are of great concern worldwide. Mexico has not escaped this environmental problem, which negatively affects aquifers, water bodies and biodiversity; but most of all, public health.

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